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. this kind of game changing innovation has enabled us to leap ahead and increase harvest and feed the whole world. sometimes these innovations come from the most advanced science. other times they are simple steps and ideas that come from looking at and listening closely to the problem. all of them can break down barriers to food security. it can allow us to allow new paths of progress. -- plow entirely new pass to progress. we need those new pathways forward. take a look at a few recent headlines. "drought and mississippi impacts everything from livestock to deer." "food shortages could force the world into vegetarians." "patent endings raises new biotech issues." "global crop production shows signs of stagnant." "could climate change be al qaeda's best friend in africa?" i could go on. when i think of the factors that make up the perfect storm, i'm reminded of what mark twain reportedly observed. by land, they're not making it anymore. i wish twain was right. the truth is, global warming is making less. we need to do more land that we still have. every year 7 billion of us on earth use th
2000 specificly named by make and model firearms used for hunting or sporting purposes. second, the bill will not take away any weapons that are owned today. anyone who says otherwise is simply trying to deceive you. finally, it would ban the future sale or transfer of these magazines, including the manufacturing, implementation, or possession. let me address for a moment the charge that the assault weapons ban such as this are unconstitutional. the original federal assault weapons ban and it was challenged repeatedly on every grounds the opponents to come up with, including the second amendment, the ninth amendment, the commerce clause, the due process clause, equal protection, and being a bill of the chamber. each and every time these challenges were rejected and the ban was upheld, including by the fourth, 6th, 9th, and d.c. circuit. the supreme court subsequently recognizes the individual rights to gun ownership in the district of columbia. however, that decision clearly stated, "the right secured by the second amendment is not unlimited." justice scalia, the author of that
they could do to reassure the u.s. and the international community, it seems to be another clear implication of what you are saying is that the u.s. takes further steps to support the syrian opposition it would be read as strengthening their view that we are out to get them. >> we are out to get assad. are we ipso facto out to get iran? are we going to protect the allies, which is something i think we need to do despite the fact that they have a bad record? no one in syria has a sterling record, but it think we need to give them the opportunity to say there is a news syria forming. do they want to be engaged? what is the relationship there? i'm not very optimistic that we could get the iranians on board, but maybe you could find a way to make them increasingly less relevant. do they equate that with a regime change? maybe. we have to be aware of it. i think that's a stretch. i think the iranians could see, what i say is increasing value in the opportunity to talk if they begin to understand that the region is not moving totally in their direction all the time, which i think indeed is the cas
. >> i hope you will share the sense of urgency many of us feel about this situation and about the dire predicaments many of those courageous -- predicament that many of those courageous fighters who are opposing the barbaric regime that the president assad regime has become. i urge you to present your recommendation to this committee as soon as possible. i hope more can be done militarily to deprive president assad of his superiority where he has in the air and his forces on the grounds that he is using to slaughter of the citizens of his own country. >> yes, sir. >> thank you, mr. chair. my time is expired. my thanks to each of you for your extraordinary service in the past. thank you. >> thank you, mr. chairman. i want to thank general austin and general rodriguez and their families for your extraordinary service to our country. i want to follow up on what senator blumenthal discussed. we worked on this no contacting with the inari provision that has given authority to d.o.d. to cut off in may -- contacting authority provision that has given d.o.d. authority to cut off funds that go
for readiness? >> we could try, but the only means of doing that was reprogramming, using very limited techniques. for every dollar that you add, you have to cut somewhere else. especially in an environment like this one, with sequestration cuts in investment accounts, there are not a lot of good sources. you have to get a member of congress to agree to this, at least all the committees. so, it cannot be anything contentious. it is not realistic to move multiple billions of legal limits on transfer authority. could some of this change? yes. congress can change the laws in ways that make this easier. we are doing worst-case planning right now, that is a fair statement. but if the cr stays in effect for the whole year, we will see serious attacks. >> if i can follow up and add, if we do follow these civilian employees, they are the ones that maintain our equipment in a lot of our depots. they have a lot of ranges on posts. if furloughed, they will love be -- they will not be there for that training environment. it is the second and third quarter. it is not the training dollars that can b
. what have we learned about this? the first thing we are learning is that, who are the kids that use this? they are not just any low-income kids. they tend to be the kids performing the worst in the traditional public schools. it looks like that is a little bit of an argument in favor of mix match. maybe some are doing poorly and parents were trying to find alternative options for them. whether or not they are succeeding is an open question. the second thing we have learned about this is kids who are participating in the voucher program are do we know better than average then the kids that would have done had they stayed in the public-school to the extent we are able to tell. there are to the statistics involved in that. more to be that i would really like. my professional judgment says they are doing no better or worse than average than they would have done on the public schools. it can interpret that positively or negatively. people who interpret that as negatively say if they are not doing any better, when are we taking money away from public schools to give it to private schools
will come back to washington come a sit down with us and hopefully we can get some sort of compromise that would stop sequestration from taking place. with that, i would like to turn it over to chairman wittman who will talk to about the dangers of sequestration. >> thanks. thanks for your eloquent laying out of the issue that is before us. just as you see here, a couple of weeks ago, we asked the chief of naval operations and the common aunt of marine corps, if this was the picture of things to come. five aircraft carriers and ports, our large portion of the naval presence there, not a c. sailors at the docs. if that was the scope of things to come. their answer to us was yes. if the sequestration went into effect, aircraft carriers not being deployed, new ones not being built, current ones not being refueled. that is significant. that cuts right to the issue of readiness. we heard from all of the service agencies the issue of readiness. termedrned that as a -- it as a readiness crisis. they need to assure that we can be victorious in whatever situation that we face. that is deeply c
that this is one of those cases. if you take a look that the authorization for use of military force, which all of us voted for the with as those of us who were here -- which all of us all take for, those of us who are here -- are we to believe that everybody on this list was responsible for the 9/11 attack? is that the rationale? >> all four of us agree with you. the 2001 aumf, which is only 60 words long about -- long, is now very long in the tooth. the extreme government solution would be for congress to work with the executive branch to revise that aumf. it is completely unclear about who it covers and where it covers it. >> it is as unclear as you suggest. this is a limitation. there were big arguments about it. there was a priory draft that was much more expensive and it was -- there was a prior draft which was much more expansive, and it was narrowed. the president has the right to keep his legal advice confidential. that is a longstanding principle. questions are raised as to whether the executive is complying with the law. if he feels he is, it was be -- would be a positive thing for t
at 9:30 eastern, the us- india relations at the carnegie endowment for international peace. and they look at sequestration, and automatic spending cuts set to go into effect march 1 that will affect federal workers. that is a 2 --- that is at 2:30 p.m. eastern. >> from the start, we told the board that the approach we were going to take, pretty straightforward. remember, we were set -- sent there to fix gm. that was the mission. go make this thing a viable company again. so we were all focused, and brought the message we are going to design, build, and sell the world's best vehicles. we are going to move quickly, we need your support, your input, and so we changed a few things about the board meeting. we shortened them considerably. we stayed away from the details or did not get in the weeds on how you build a car, but the bigger questions of financing, more out, positioning, marketing, that sort of thing. the board was very supportive of that, and we kept them informed. you know, we just took off. >> leading general motors through bankruptcy and the government bailout, for
call or e-mail us. we also want to hear from you on twitter. in january, a northwestern university professor david figlio talked about school choice at the university of florida law school. this is an hourlong event. >> thank you. the bob graham's center for public service is very pleased to co-sponsor this. this is a great policy for us to look at. david figlio is the professor of education, social policy and economics at northwestern university. he is also a research associate at the national bureau of economic research and a founding member of the research program on the economics of education. his research on education and social policy has been funded by the u.s. department of education, the nih and the gates foundation among many others. his current research involves evaluating the tax credit scholarship program, the largest school voucher program in the united states. conducting a large-scale study of school accountability in florida and following children from birth through school career to study keep questions regarding early childhood poverty analysts inequality. prior to
is going to include a cyber element to it. that is going to be part of the weapon that will be used to cripple us in the event of an attack. and i have to say, the united states, as part of our strategy, looking at how we would go after an enemy, we consider the importance of cyber or the cyber element as important. so, yes, we are living in that world. i have said this, and i believe it. it is very possible that the next pearl harbor can be a cyber attack. you could, in fact, cripple, as i said, are power grid, our financial systems, with a cyber attack, and it would have one hell of an impact on the united states of america. that is something we have to worry about and protect against. >> good morning, mr. secretary. i am an international student from japan. i would like to ask your opinion on the island dispute between china and japan. it was revealed that the chinese vessel had lot weapons on the japanese navy. i want to hear how much you think an issue this was. >> i was just in that part of the world in the last few months. i had a chance to go to japan and visit with my count
you all for joining us here today and thank you all who joined us. [applause] >> in a few moments, secretary of state john kerry gives an address at the university of virginia. in an hour, a defense -- department of defense briefing on sequestration. after that, it review of the 2012 presidential campaign with strategists from president obama and mitt romney. secretary of state john kerry is calling on congress not to make senseless reductions in foreign aid to automatic spending cuts scheduled to begin march 1. the secretary spoke at the university of virginia in charlottesville. he was introduced by virginia senator tim kaine. this is an hour. [applause] >> thank you very much. thank you so much. hello, uva. it is great to be back on the grounds. i want to say to president sullivan what a treat it is to be here with you. thank you for hosting this great occasion. to my friend robert hurt, served with him in state government and now we travel to washington together. i look forward to good work together, especially if on this occasion to introduce secretary kerry and to introduce
commission several years ago to help us. senator levin and others supported. the house supported and it passed, to help us determine how much further we could continue to draw down our nuclear weapons. john glenn was on it, lee hamilton, james woolsey, they had access to the defense department secret documents and information and they came out with quite a different view. let me point out some of the things they came up with. they said maintain the triad. they said maintain tactical nuclear weapons. they recommended no change in the alert status. the defense department's nuclear posture review under president obama and secretary gates found the alert status should not be altered. they fundamentally found a need for nuclear-weapons. that's the point. your commission basically says it undermines their request for nuclear-weapons. i will give you a chance to respond. global zero foresaw this argument before your report was issued. they said "the conditions that might make possible the global elimination of nuclear weapons are not present today and their creation would require a fund
created by congress to govern. we were created to help govern the nation. this is what brings us to our hearing today. we will focus on the impact of the sequester. i think it is a bad idea. it is bad policy. it is a bad economic policy. it is bad governing policy. i really do not like it. it is working with the leadership to be able to find a way to avoid the sequester in the hopes that a higher power find a way for the nine years that it is mandated. what we hope to accomplish today is to take a look at the impacts if the sequester happens for the american people. thank you for everyone coming. we thank you for speaking about defense. it has been well heard and well spoken. we look toward to hearing from you, secretary napolitano. in the u.s. military, military, those who wear the uniform, will be protected in the sequester, and they should. there are others that need to be protected. what is the impact of them? and also the future of the country, the ability to -- the middle class. this is where secretary donovan, we want to talk to about housing and the economy. what is it that we n
>> let's talk about recent comments in canada, the u.s. ambassador to canada and find that more action by canada on climate change might make it easier for the president to approve keystone. how did you interpret those comments? >> i think it was another opportunity to talk about what we are doing. i believe for the president and for canada, it is both. you can actually improve energy security and in our neighborhood of north america and with vehicle emissions standards, coal plants standards, you will eventually see that in the united states. nobody is replacing a coal plant with coal again. they are replacing it with natural gas. it reduces emissions by 50%. i did not see that as a quid pro quo. when the secretary of state and our minister of foreign affairs met and had a press conference, they talked about both climate change and energy security. we talked about vehicle emissions standards. th minister talked about the action we've taken had the the united states on coal plants in canada. i closed down some coal plants. i thought it was good for our jurisdiction but i think e
to fix immigration, which would be huge, but an opportunity for us to demonstrate to the country that finally we can do something that is hard, and we can do it in a bipartisan way. >> when you think about it and you stepped out these principles, including finding a track for citizens to get legal -- but you bump them back behind those that are there. i have read through them. but what point, when you get into deeper specifics -- i have read through the colorado compact and what the group of eight have put on the table. it reads as principals. it does not read specifically. when do you begin losing the bipartisan flamboyance? >> there will be bumps in the road. it will not be an easy thing to do. if it worries you -- were easy to do, it would have been done a long time ago. there are parties ready to get this done, who have heard from home the same things i am hearing. i think we have momentum and need to keep pushing. the principles we enunciated are much more specific. the notion with the colorado complex is similar to what we did when i went in a superintendent, which was to g
the legal justification for the treatment of terrorist detainees in u.s. custody. within months of taking office released several olc memos describing the legal justification for the treatment of terrorist detainees in u.s. custody. do you think it was appropriate that a different standard was applied to the release of the memos from the bush administration than those produced by the obama administration? >> i do not think there was a different standard. >> one was released within four months of the obama administration taking office. the other had been requested for a much longer time. >> i am not a lawyer. i have come to learn of the term sui generis. the olc memos released after the president came into office were released because the program was terminated. olc will counsel opinions, and those opinions were looked at in a different way because of the sui generis circumstances. >> both are essential for the ability of congress to carry its oversight responsibilities. finally, the intelligence reform act and terrorist prevention act of 2004, with which you are very familiar and which i
on the climate change front, this might help us. canadian politicians are running around now that there is greenhouse gas admission in the air. they are going to great length to point that out. who is a real climate laggard if the u.s. is not serious on getting on this. >> that is the point. language is important. it can be a real problem. that relativity will be pointed to. given the breath of things, the things that we need to do together and the issues we need to tackle together has a common view. that ranges from foreign affairs to our common economic future. it would be unhelpful if this was more than just a bump in the road that became something that pushed us off the road. >> i think danielle wanted to jump in. before that, i get a sense of your questions in the audience. i see some hands. ok. if you change your mind and more hands went to ask, i will get to that depending on how much time is reserved. >> the decision around the keystone is not necessarily lateral. who will be point our finger at if the president makes a decision we do not like? canada has played a rol
"commitment to the values that define us as americans." others note his impeccable integrity and his dedication to the country is second to none. without unanimous consent, i would like to insert into the record matters the committee has received in regard to brennan's nomination. john brennan by all accounts will be a strong leader, guided firmly by the law and his strong ethical code. he has assured the committee in his response to pre-hearing questions that he will be independent from political influence. he will seek only to provide the president, the congress, and other leaders with his best analysis and advice. his responses to the committee's questions are available on the committee's website. intelligence.senate.gov. of course the committee must conduct its due diligence on such an important nominee, some members are going to have questions in a range of topics, including his plans for directing the agency, major national security challenges we face, positions and actions he has taken in his current and past jobs. also of interest will be mr. brennan's the view on the use of
of this committee is one that is very proud to work together. i'm happy that you are here with us to help move that tradition forward at a greater and deeper rate. we deeply appreciate it. less than two miles from where we sit today at the entrance of u.s. treasury building that is a large, bronze statue. one would assume that the figure is alexander hamilton. america's first treasury secretary. look again. this 12 foot tall statue is of albert gallatin. the longest serving u.s. treasury. in a to one, thomas jefferson asked gallatin to serve. --in 1801, thomas jefferson asked gallatin to serve here in the place of treasury secretary is more than avarice and response will -- laborous and responsible than any other. what did he do? he established fiscal discipline that was necessary a country into a great world power. gallatin also help orchestrate the louisiana purchase, doubling the size of the united states. his work is commemorated in gallatin county, montana and a beautiful gallatin national forest in the rockies as well as the gallatin river in missouri. when gallatin accepted the decision
as an old friend, those of us with whom he served during your years in the senate. there are few jobs were demanding that the position to which you have been nominated. the hours are long and extremely challenging, and require sacrifices from both the secretary and his family. we traditionally give our nominees an opportunity to introduce their families at these hearings, and we would welcome your doing so during your opening statement. if confirmed, senator hagel would be the first former enlisted man and the first veteran of the vietnam war to serve as secretary of defense. you cannot read and senator hagel's account of his military service and not be impressed by it. as senator hagel explained a few years ago, but " probably most fundamental for me, when we talk about going to war, we need to think it through carefully, not just for the political and diplomatic and economic consequences, and those are important, but at least for me, this old infantry sergeant thinks about when i was in vietnam in 1968. someone needs to represent that perspective in our government as well. the people in
on your tv while you are talking to us. what do you want to see him do next? caller: i would like to see him follow through on health care for medicare and senior citizens and all the people who cannot afford insurance. and insurance is increasing dramatically for normal middle- class people. they will be losing their jobs the cows of the factor that these companies are cutting back, and it is very depressing. host: what did you think about senator rubio's speech? you are a republican. we heard from a prior floridian she was not a fan. what did you think of the content? caller: i thought he was trying to be very honest with the people and trying to tell them basically how he felt, that it really was going to be for the middle class people and how it was going to effect all the middle class people. host: independent line, new york. caller: how are you? host: good, thanks. we heard about immigration. what did you make of the immigration comments? caller: i think that it is about time. as far as i know, he has pretty much sealed the border, which is what the republicans are hinging everythi
already started to affect business decisions. so we've been reminded that while it's critical for us to cut wasteful spending, we can't just cut our way to prosperity. deep, indiscriminate cuts to things like education and training, energy and national security will cost us jobs, and it will slow down our recovery. it's not the right thing to do for the economy. it's not the right thing for folks who are out there still looking for work. and the good news is this doesn't have to happen. for all the drama and disagreements that we've had over the past few years, democrats and republicans have still been able to come together and cut the deficit by more than $2.5 trillion through a mix of spending cuts and higher rates on taxes for the wealthy. a balanced approach has achieved more than $2.5 trillion in deficit reduction. that's more than halfway towards the $4 trillion in deficit reduction that economists and elected officials from both parties believe is required to stabilize our debt. so we've made progress. and i still believe that we can finish the job with a balanced mix of spend
. what is holding us back? let's streamline the process and help our economy grow. these initiatives and manufacturing, and energy, infrastructure, housing, all these will help entrepreneurs in small business owners expand and create new jobs. but none of it will matter unless we also equipped our citizens with the skills and training to fill those jobs. [applause] and that has to start at the earliest possible age. you know, study after study shows that the sooner a child begins learning, the better he or she does down the road. but today fewer than three in 10 four-year-olds are enrolled in a high quality preschool program. most middle-class parents cannot afford a few hundred bucks a week for a private preschool. and for poor kids, who need help the most, this lack of access to preschool education can shatter them for the rest of their lives. so tonight i propose working with states to make high-quality preschool available to every single child in america. [applause] every dollar we invest in high quality childhood education can save seven dollars later on by boosting regulation r
been talked about and defined, as i said the main the 2006 quartet principles and u.s. resolutions -- u.n. resolutions that that is part of a final status set of issues that have to be resolved. the united states, no other country can impose that on israel. that is a negotiable issue. but it has been out there. that remains to be dealt with in negotiations. >> is it one that you think the united states should encourage? >> i would encourage peace and a secure, safe israel. that is what i think most of this would want to see. >> ok. in 2009, you made a statement suggesting that u.s. ground troops should be sent to that part of the world and installed as u.n. peacekeepers in a "non- militarize palestinian state." is that appropriate? >> i don't have the facts in front of me, but i don't think that that was earmarked -- a recommendation was making. as i recall my comments and you may be able to give me exactly the comments, they were in the context of how do you secure israel's border? who secures israel's border? it has been suggested that this is a peacekeeping role for nato. that is wha
is 35 minutes. >> good morning everybody. thank you for joining us. today, we're going to be making an announcement about an important change to our national delivery schedule. i think anyone who has followed the postal service over the past couple of years know that we have been consistently making changes to our delivery schedule. it is an important part of our strategy returning back to financial stability and it is absolutely necessary to make that move. before i get into the details of the announcement, i would like to spend a couple of minutes discussing the financial reasons for this scheduled delivery change. since 2008, we have seen a steady decline in the use of first class mail. it is our most profitable product and generates the most revenue. people pay their bills online, simple, easy and free. on the other hand, people do -- still like to receive hard copy statements and bills and the fact that businesses continue to send mail to the homes and that's been pretty stable over the past few years, show people do value the mail that they receive. however, they do like to ma
, the 25 minute debate on the senate floor. >> it is now time for us to vote up or down on the nomination for many reasons. the nomination has been before us now inadequate time to get the information which our colleagues have asked for. there is also the looming fact of sequestration. we need to have a secretary of defense who is not only in office, but whose leadership is not in limbo, but is there. our troops need it. their families needed. our country needs it. we have 66,000 military arsenal in harms way in afghanistan. the president of afghanistan has directed the united states to remove its special operations forces from a key afghan province. our military bases key decisions about the pace of the drawdown between now and the end of 2014. the size and composition of a residual force in terms of conditions for the ongoing presence in afghanistan of the united states coalition partners after 2014. at the same time, we face new and growing threats elsewhere, including the ongoing threats posed by iran's nuclear weapons program and the civil war in syria with the risk that there could
government can't control the weather, he accuses us of wanting dirty water and dirty air. when we suggest to strengthen our safety net programs he accuses of wanting us to leave the elderly to defend themselves. he even criticized us to race taxes to delay military cut, cuts that were his idea in the first place. his favorite attack of all, those who don't agree with him only care about rich people. mr. president, i still live in the same neighborhood i grew up. my neighbors are not millionaires, they are workers who have to get up tomorrow morning and pay the bills. they are immigrants and they came here because they were stuck in improvement. the tax increases and the deficit spending that you proposed will hurt middle class families. it will cost them their raises, it will cost them their benefits, it will kevin cost some of them their jobs. it will hurt seniors because it does nothing to help them. i want to protect my neighbors. hard working americans who don't need us to come up with a plan to grow the government, they need a plan to grow the middle class. economic growth is the bes
and nearly doubling our use of renewable energy in this country. he's helped to forge what's probably the strongest working relationship with tribal leaders that the federal government has seen in modern times. and when the unexpected has happened, like the gulf oil spill or hurricane sandy, he's been on the ground making sure that people get help right away and we deal with these challenges as professionally as possible. so i really like ken salazar, if you haven't gotten the point. ken is now ready to head back to colorado and spend more time with hope and his family and so in addition to just saying thank you, ken, for the extraordinary work that you've done, ken is also going to have the opportunity to introduce his successor. and i am extraordinarily proud today to nominate another strong and capable leader to take the reins at interior and that is ms. sally jewell. in high school sally's aptitude test showed she had a knack for mechanical reasonable and spatial -- we check. we do thorough vetting before nominations. of course her recommended professions after she took these prof
to the u.s., it is very diverse. when approbation was passed, there was concern it was not diverse enough. since then it has become very diverse. these are adding 55,000 visas that are getting 8 million applications each year, randomly allocated by computerized lottery. that is a somewhat odd way to set priorities. the commission said we should set priorities and we should deliver on them. and the diversity visa program it felt then and it would say now it does not rise to that level of priority compared to the other priorities. >> . alamance time has expired. -- the gentleman's time has expired. >> i think it is important we modernize our immigration system. we agree that we have a broken immigration system but we need to find a solution to the promise we have by being fair. we need to be fair to the millions of americans that want to follow the rule of law. we need to be fair to the millions of people who are waiting in line to come legally to the united states and we have to be fair to the 11 million people who are here illegally. i have a few questions about this. i want to ask, you s
are the current policies that are in place that prevent us from lowering that unemployment rate? >> congresswoman, i think you described well a number of the factors that we see underlying factors that are leading to economic growth. but as we've said, we think that the remaining parts of what had been the fiscal cliff, the remaining parts are still a damper to economic growth this year and one of the things that congress might do to boost economic growth this year is to not let that fiscal tightening take effect. >> the sequester? >> there are a number of pieces to that, but one crucial piece is the sequester and if the congress were to not have the sequester, then that would strengthen output this year and would lead to 750,000 more jobs in the fourth quarter. at the same time, if there aren't offsetting changes made later, the extra debt would be a drag on the economy medium term and long-term. >> that's what i'm hearing from folks at home, major employers. we have a large port. if we reduce infrastructure spending, they anticipate cutbacks and private businesses especially. large research uni
for the under-employed u.s. workforce who could be attractive if they were attractive but i do not know what the conditions are in the forms and carries that you are describing so i cannot comment on that. >> you think it is >> do you think it is a financial issue? these are not necessarily the most skilled, but different skilled. >> i do pick strawberries in the summer in oregon. >> i think we went to the same school. >> did we? i did not know that. >> it was interesting, difficult, and well paid job for a college student during the summer. i do not think there are any jobs like that anymore. it is a different workforce that is the strawberry taking in oregon now. -- picking in oregon now. there has been a shift. did we really go to the same college? >> we did. in portland. i think i used all of my time. >> i thank the gentle lady. >> it is good to have mayor castro here from san antonio. san antonio is like my own hometown, corpus christi. you have a pretty good basketball team. i wanted to visit with you a little bit. i really do sympathize. we have a big problem. i think we
well outlined, mr. chairman. jack is no stranger to us. i met him there decades ago when i was a wide eyed congressman and he was a top aide for house speaker, tip o'neill. we became friends. he taught us a whole lot. i know that tip a tremendous influence on jack. it is clear that he shares the same work ethic and sense of duty. he shares another thing -- bipartisanship. speaker o'neill was renown for sitting down with president reagan and trying to work problems out. jack was heavily involved in that and continues to be. he is a bipartisan person who wants to be successful at working with both parties. you mentioned the issue with trust. there is no straighter shooter than jack lew. he is one of the most honorable, honest, and decent men in washington. when he gives you facts, they are backed up with research. from the time i knew jack when he started in tip o'neill's office, he would always outline both sides of the argument and give each without bias. he would tell you where he came down, but he always let you make your own judgment. that has propelled him to an extremely successf
not be friendly to us. that story died before it was aired. it was apparently based on a hoax. these are unfair innuendos. they have been answered. you know they are unfair. senator hagel has an extensive record of service to his country. as a young man, he enlisted in the army, served with distinction in vietnam, he served as the deputy administrator of the va during the reagan administration, he was a businessman. many of are bit him during his two terms in that u.s. senate eerie decency left, he has continued to serve -- many of them served with him during his two terms in the u.s. senate before he left. he has continued to serve. senator hagel has been endorsed by five former secretaries of defense, three former secretaries of state, and six former national security advisers who served in both democratic and republican administrations. he has been endorsed by the veterans of foreign wars. he has received this important -- and the non-commissioned officers association. last month, senator hagel was endorsed in a letter signed i sit former u.s. ambassadors to israel -- signed by former u.s. a
Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)

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